Research for Her FAQs

If you need technical assistance using the research for her registry, please download our Technical Assistance FAQ as a quick reference guide. 

1. What is research for her?  

2. Why should I join?

3. How much of my time is needed?

4. Can I join the registry even if I don’t have cancer?

5. Will a patient’s decision to participate in the research for her registry impact their clinical care at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center?  

6. Can I join the registry if I don’t live in Los Angeles or receive care at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center?

7. If I join the registry, will I definitely be contacted about participating in a research study?

8. If I am contacted for a study, will I have the opportunity to decide whether or not I want to participate in the study that I qualify for?

9. Can I say no to participating in a study and still be considered for others?

10. What are Clinical Therapeutic Trials vs. Clinical Trials?  

11. Are there Clinical Therapeutic Trials provided by the Women’s Cancer Program at Cedars-Sinai?

12. Will the information I provide remain strictly confidential?

13. If I have more questions who should I contact?

 

1. What is research for her?  

research for her is a large data registry sponsored by the Women’s Cancer Program at the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.  The purpose of the registry is to:  
• Aid in the development of future risk assessment models to help predict cancer risks
• Identify candidates for participation in clinical trials and studies.  Studies may include clinical therapeutic trials for those with a personal history of cancer, screening studies for those without cancer, and other epidemiologic studies that follow individuals over time for data collection
• Track outcomes of patients who are treated at participating centers and offices to find opportunities to improve care

2. Why should I join?

Joining the registry is a way to be a part of efforts to improve early detection of cancers and to better target treatments for individuals with a cancer.  For those without cancer, joining the registry is a way to learn about screening trials that seek to find early detection of cancers. For those with cancer, joining the registry is a way to learn about clinical therapeutic trials that may expand treatment opportunities. For all women, joining the registry is a way to show support of the research to end cancer as a threat to women.

3. How much of my time is needed?

It will only take you about 10-15 minutes to complete the consent and to answer the short questionnaire.  

4. Can I join the registry even if I don’t have cancer?

Yes. Any woman over the age of 18, with or without cancer, are invited participate in the research for her registry.  We are very interested in enrolling all women, regardless of health history.  

5.     Will a patient’s decision to participate in the research for her registry impact their clinical care at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center?  

No. Participation in any clinical research study is completely voluntary and will not impact your medical care in any way.

6. Can I join the registry if I don’t live in Los Angeles or receive care at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center?

Yes.  The Women’s Cancer Program partners with many other research institutions and would be able to link participants to research studies in other cities, if appropriate.

7. If I join the registry, will I definitely be contacted about participating in a research study?

No. You will only be contacted if a study becomes available that you are qualified to participate in.  New studies open often, so even if you are not contacted immediately after consenting, you may be contacted in the future.

8. If I am contacted for a study, will I have the opportunity to decide whether or not I want to participate in the study that I qualify for?

Yes.  Participation in any research study is completely voluntary.  You will be notified by registry staff if you may be eligible for another study.  At that time, you can decide if you would like to participate or not.  If you choose to participate in the additional study, you will need to sign a consent for participation in the new study.  

9. Can I say no to participating in a study and still be considered for others?

Yes.  If you choose not to participate in a study, you will still be contacted about additional studies that become available.

10. What are Clinical Therapeutic Trials vs. Clinical Trials?  

Clinical therapeutic trials are a treatment option for many people with cancer.  By participating in cancer treatment research studies, you have the opportunity to help doctors discover new and improved ways to fight this disease. All of the treatments we have today are available because others volunteered to participate in clinical trials.

There are other clinical research studies available at Cedars-Sinai that are not focused on treating cancer.  For example, there are some studies focused on early detection and screening and there are other studies focused on gathering clinical data to better understand risks associated with certain types of cancers.

11. Are there Clinical Therapeutic Trials provided by the Women’s Cancer Program at Cedars-Sinai?

Yes.  There are many clinical trials available at the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute within Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.  To see if you qualify for one of the clinical trials, you will need to undergo trial-specific screening tests, as well as an assessment from one of the study doctors.  Please call our Clinical Trial Recruitment Navigator at (310) 423-2133 for additional details and to learn about available trials.

12. Will the information I provide remain strictly confidential?

All demographic and clinical information you provide is secured in a protected database and will remain confidential.

13. If I have more questions who should I contact?

If you have questions, please contact the research for her Program Coordinator at (310) 423-5408 or at diane.park@cshs.org.