Our Partners

As an outgrowth of innovation and technology transfer networking and workshops that Cedars-Sinai has held, partnership agreements have been signed with these organizations:

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and its Central European partners are participating in the European Union Research and Technology Development Program and have initiated several proposals for funding by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Science Foundation and the NIH's Fogarty International Center.

Representatives of Cedars-Sinai and Central and Eastern European medical research organization met in early 2001. This led to research and technology transfer agreements between Cedars-Sinai and four Hungarian universities in September 2001. Since then, new partners from Czech Republic, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia have joined the international research networking, innovation and technology transfer program.

These partnerships focus on major public health issues and common areas of interest.

Partnership Agreements

The Technology Collaboration Letter Agreement with each partner provides that the details for sharing royalty income for a specific technology will be set forth in a separate cooperation agreement. Cedars-Sinai believes it is essential to have the same royalty sharing guidelines that will apply to all cooperation agreements entered into with the various partners. The success of the relationship between Cedars-Sinai and each partner necessitates that the terms of this element of the relationship be consistent and transparent.

Partners can be divided into two main categories: (i) those that have an existing institutional policy governing the sharing of royalty income with its faculty/inventors and (ii) those that do not have an existing institutional policy governing the sharing of royalty income with its faculty/inventors. An inventor's enthusiastic participation in the institutional technology transfer program is essential to the ultimate success of the program. Thus, Cedars-Sinai recommends that each partner establishes a royalty sharing policy for its faculty/inventor at the institutional level. Although some partners already have these policies established, we recognize that other partners require additional time to address these important issues within the parameters of their respective processes. In short, implementing substantive sharing policies at some institutions can take time. Until each partner is able to complete the process required to establish the recommended practice of having an institutional royalty sharing policy, we will need to have guidelines for the technology collaboration letter agreements to accommodate partners that have an established policy and partners that do not have an established policy.

Therefore, effective from the date of this notice, Cedars-Sinai will apply the following royalty sharing structure in all cooperation agreements entered into for invention disclosures submitted under the existing technology collaboration letter agreements:

1. Sharing formula for partners that have a royalty sharing policy for its faculty/inventors:

· Partner university receives: 60% net income (as defined below)
· Cedars-Sinai receives: 40% net income
· The faculty/inventor receives his or her share from the partner's share in accordance with the institutional royalty sharing policy.

2. Sharing formula for partners that do not have a royalty sharing policy for its faculty/inventors:

· Partner university receives: 45% net income
· Cedars-Sinai receives: 40% net income
· Faculty/inventor receives: 15% net income
· The faculty/inventor receives his or her share in accordance with the terms of the cooperation agreement for that specific invention.
 

Building Momentum for Transferring Technology to Application

In response to the requests from our sister academic institutions, the Medical Center began providing assistance with the development of institutional policies and procedures to provide a basis for managing the intellectual assets in a professional manner.

These individual requests formed the basis for our conviction that Central and East Europe deserves education and direct assistance with initiating technology transfer programs. Without this outreach project, we were concerned that our partners from this region would continue to be taken advantage of unfairly by multinational corporations due to the lack of institutional understanding and processes to manage these intellectual assets.

This is, we believe, an essential foundation if the academic sector is going to be able to support the national efforts to establish development-oriented intellectual property policies. Without the ability to appreciate innovation management issues, the public will not receive the benefit of the implementation of these policies.

Research and Innovation Strategic Alliance of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Central-Eastern European (CEE) Academic Organization