Personal Statement

Edwin Posadas, MD, is medical director of the Urologic Oncology Program of the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute and the clinical co-chief of the Division of Hematology/Oncology of the Department of Medicine at Cedars-Sinai. He holds academic rank of associate professor in the Department of Medicine at Cedars-Sinai and the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Posadas is a board-certified medical oncologist and physician scientist who specializes in the care of cancers of the genitourinary tract with a particular emphasis on advanced prostate cancer as well as kidney cancer and bladder cancer. He is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University earning baccalaureate degrees in biomedical engineering and chemical engineering from the GWC Whiting School of Engineering. He then received his medical degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His internship and residency in internal medicine were completed at the University of Michigan Medical Center followed by a postgraduate fellowship in medical oncology and hematology at the National Cancer Institute and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health.

Posadas has won several awards for his academic and clinical work including being named as a Fellow of the American College of Physician and a Prostate Cancer Foundation Young Investigator. He has been named a Los Angeles Top Doctor and a Leading Physician by the International Association of Oncologists. He was recruited to Cedars-Sinai from the University of Chicago and now leads a translational research cancer program focused on prostate cancer. In addition to his clinical practice, he runs a research laboratory funded by the National Cancer Institute, Department of Defense, Prostate Cancer Foundation and several chartable foundations in addition to generous support from philanthropists. His laboratory focuses on the biology of metastasis with an emphasis on FYN, a member of the SRC kinase family and the role of circulating tumor cells in cancer progression.