Nursing Leader, Cancer Expert Earn Top Honor

Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN Beth Y. Karlan, MD
 

Two nationally recognized leaders from Cedars-Sinai have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine, one of the highest honors in healthcare.

Linda Burnes Bolton, DrPH, RN, FAAN, and Beth Y. Karlan, MD, are among 80 new members named to the academy based on their contributions to health and medicine. The two join an organization widely recognized as a national resource for independent, scientifically informed analysis and recommendations on health issues.

"The selection of Drs. Karlan and Burnes Bolton reflects their trailblazing work in two fields of medicine that are vital to the health of our communities," said Thomas M. Priselac, Cedars-Sinai president and CEO. "They have much to be proud of in their elections."

Burnes Bolton, vice president for Nursing and chief nursing officer, has become one of the nation's most visible and respected figures in the nursing profession. Over four decades, she has championed higher education for nurses to further professionalize the field and has worked to promote diversity and inclusion within healthcare. Her work has influenced policies at the national and international levels and has fostered lasting change in local communities.

As president of the National Black Nurses Association in the early 1990s, Burnes Bolton led a national campaign sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to improve community health by linking physicians and nurses in professional societies with neighborhoods, beauty shops and local organizations.

Burnes Bolton has played crucial leadership roles in other professional organizations and academic institutions. She chaired an advisory panel for Transforming Care at the Bedside, a national initiative that produced recommendations for empowering caregivers to generate and test new ideas for delivering safe, quality care.

She also was a principal founder and designer of the Collaborative Alliance for Nursing Outcomes, a 1996 partnership between the Association of California Nurse Leaders and the American Nurses Association-California to establish reliable indicators for evaluating the impact of nursing.

Under Burnes Bolton's leadership, Cedars-Sinai founded the Geri and Richard Brawerman Nursing Institute in 2002 to help expand the supply of skilled nurses in the Los Angeles region.

Burnes Bolton is president of the 5,000-member American Organization of Nurse Executives and a past president of the American Academy of Nursing.

"I am pleased to be recognized for my contributions to healthcare and science," she said. "The academy provides the nation with advice on important issues impacting the health of individuals, populations and communities. I look forward to contributing to this important work."

Karlan, director of the Women's Cancer Program at the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, has devoted her career to improving the understanding and treatment of gynecologic malignancies. She has advocated nationally for greater public awareness, education and research funding in the field.

A surgeon and researcher, Karlan has focused her work on the discovery of ovarian cancer biomarkers to aid in early detection of the disease and in the identification of molecular therapies. She also studies inherited susceptibility to cancer, particularly the clinical impact of mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for women's cancers.

In 2012, Karlan was appointed by the White House to the National Cancer Advisory Board, a committee that advises the National Cancer Institute. She serves as editor-in-chief of Gynecologic Oncology and Gynecologic Oncology Reports, the leading scientific journals in her field. She also serves on an Institute of Medicine committee that evaluates the state of ovarian cancer research.

At Cedars-Sinai, Karlan is director of the Gilda Radner Hereditary Cancer Program and holds the Board of Governors Chair in Gynecologic Oncology. Additionally, she is director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology and professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

"It's been a privilege to have had opportunities to make meaningful contributions to the field of gynecologic oncology and impact the lives of women with cancer," Karlan said. "I'm incredibly honored that my peers have recognized these contributions with my election to the National Academy of Medicine."

Burnes Bolton and Karlan are among 70 U.S. members elected to the academy this year. An additional 10 international members also have been elected. The new members raise the academy's total U.S. membership to 1,826. Its international roster has grown to 137 members.